Preview: Johnny Hoe River – Norman Wells

In July of 2016 we paddled the lower part of Johnny Hoe River down to Great Bear Lake. We followed the shoreline to Deline were we made a short stop. Great Bear River took us down to Tulita and Mackenzie River. Distance appoximately 600km/400 miles. Fantastic trip! Here is a preview. I’ll write more about it later.

/josun07@gmail.com

img_0050img_0350img_0323img_0292img_0152img_0078img_0076img_0673iimg_0650img_0607iimg_0493iimg_0456iimg_0394img_0693img_0700img_0740img_0762img_0769img_0774img_0776img_0780img_0782img_0884iimg_0900img_0941img_0978img_1000img_1068img_1074img_1135img_1144

/josun07@gmail.com

 

 

Advertisements

St Charles Rapids, Great Bear River, NWT

A few samples of paddling St Charles Rapids, Great Bear River, NWT. The full video is 45 minutes. It was shot in late July 2016.

St Charles Rapids

 

Great Bear Lake

We were four who went. Two of us had been several times in the Northwest Territories, but never to Great Bear Lake.

We had dreamt of Great Bear Lake for many years. Untouched nature, crystal clear water with lots of fish, big fish. The lake holds a number fishing records. Several Lake Trouts over seventy pounds have been caught.

The lake is the world's ninth largest and is hidden away at the Arctic Circle in northern Canada. There are no roads up there so you have to fly. Either you can charter a plane, for example in Yellowknife, or try to find a scheduled flights up to the area.
After examining and comparing prices, we managed to find an acceptable solution. Price was a top priority. Two of the participants were students, my brother Simon and his childhood friend Andreas. We had contacted a fishing camp in the northern part of the lake. They could offer residual seats on their flights up to camp. We could also get access to the camp amenities, rent canoes, help with transportation to the starting point. In short, they offered to solve many of the logistical problems at a cost of about 3,000 canadian dollars. The price included flights from the city of Winnipeg in southern Canada. Winnipeg can be easily reached by regular flights from Europe.
We expected to not have to buy any special equipment. We intended to use what we already had. Fishing equipment, tents, sleeping bags, clothes, etc. that you can use in Swedish conditions are ideal. As shown in the pictures, it's no exclusive equipment we are talking about. Andreas dug up an Ambassadeur reel from the late 70's. Sure, we bought some extra lures in Winnipeg because the prices were good. But the food was the biggest expenditure item.

After a day in Winnipeg, it was finally time to fly up to the fishing camp. Early in the morning we met the other excited passengers at the airport. The plane, a Boeing 727, would make several stops at various fishing camps in the Northwest Territories. Our destination was the last. With stops the trip took about 6 hours. There were many Americans, some Canadians. They go up and fish for a week or two. They fish almost exclusively from a boat, guides are included.
At the camp hearty meals are served . Lodging is small comfortable cabins with varying number of beds, to suit different groups. In the evening there is an open bar by the fireplace. To go here and fish for a week is a real luxury. Life is comfortable and the chance to catch a dream fish is good. However, we were looking for a different experience.

The sea plane makes a sharp turn and drops steeply to land on the water. We are landing in a bay on the southeast side of a large island, Richardson Island. The island is one of the few in the area, that has a name.

It is named after Sir John Richardson who explored the area in the 1800s. From here we paddle about 20 km, through an archipelago like area, to the outlet of Camsell River.
The next day we reach outlet exhausted and with aching muscles, after a heavy paddling against the wind. I take one 8 pound lake trout on the first attempt. We catch fish on almost every cast. We get lake trout, pike and grayling. Out in the Great Bear Lake there is no pike. The water is too cold for the fish to thrive. But here at the outlet, warmer water from the lake systems Hottah- and Faber Lake makes it more pleasant for the pikes. We also catch a number of 2 pound graylings. They bite, much to our surprise, on large spoons and spinners like the Mörrum.

How do you prepare to paddle all day? Often there are also severe weather which makes the effort harder. The experience of the past times we’ve been out in a similar circumstances have shown, that it is impossible to cover long distances from the start. This is true no matter how hard we trained.
The stamina required to paddle hard for ten to twelve hours is gained after a week or so. We have never been able to afford the luxury of preparing us through a training camp filled with canoeing. Instead, we have focused on being in good general shape both cardio- and strength-wise. Weight training is recommended to avoid injuries during the first critical week. In particular strength in the arms, back and shoulders is important. If you are in good general shape from the start you can expect to multiply the time you can paddle a day. The longest distance we paddled in a day, was about 40 miles. We did this after having been out on the lake for two weeks.

On July 8:th, we break camp early in the morning, on an island off Richardson Island. The weather is good sunshine, light wind and about 15 degrees Celsius. The weather is especially important today because we are going out to Great Bear lake’s open water. We will paddle north along the shoreline and will no longer be protected by the islands in the archipelago-like area inside the Richardson Island. We have been warned of strong winds and big waves. Some say that Great Bear Lake is not suitable for canoeing at all, because the weather can be so unpredictible and violent. There is a some apprehension in the air when we start paddling out through the channel that the guides at Plummer’s fishing camp call “Action Alley”.
We decide to take a short break when we approach the mouth of the channel. We stop in a stony open area. We are about to experience the best fishing any of us have seen. The rocky shore plunges down to the depths. Somewhere down there are lots of fish, big fish 10-15 pounders. The fish bite hard and decisive on every throw. This one of the few times when we all four stands and fights fish simultaneously. When we summarize the catch, we have caught a total of 200 pounds. Andreas was the largest weighing 15 pounds. Perfectly acceptable for about 20 minutes of fishing.

The mouth of the channel is intimidating with its steep vertical cliffs with no opportunity go ashore. The lake is endless. It looks like a sea. In the horizon no land can be seen just haze. We are greeted by a cold breeze that testify that the water temperature is significantly lower out here. The water is very deep.

Charlton bay July 11. It is sunny and warm in the morning, more than 20 degrees Celsius, no wind. As we start to paddle a cold mist starts creeping in from the lake. It is a beautiful sight and Fredrik takes the opportunity to take some pictures of the phenomenon.

The fog is increasing and after a while visibility is becoming worryingly low. We keep an eye on the compass and stay close to the shoreline to avoid losing sight of land. As we paddle on, the wind picks up. The fog dissolves and turns into drizzle. The temperature has dropped dramatically in the last hour. It’s now getting really cold. Since it has become almost time for a lunch break and we want to put on our rain gear, we go ashore on an island. We are about to get a lesson in Great Bear lake’s infamous weather. The rain and the wind picks up even more. The temperature keeps dropping. It is now just a few degrees above freezing. In just a few hours we have gone from mid-summer to late autumn weather. We pull the canoes up on land. The waves have become so big that we are afraid they will take them. We cook lunch and take the decision to wait a few hours for the weather to calm down. We remain on the island for two days.

Unnamed island on July 13. The wind has now died down but the big swells continue to roll in. When they reach the shore they break in white foam. It does not look that dangerous once you are out from the shore.

But we realize that getting back on land could become problematic. We are getting impatient. We want to go. We all recognize that it is a dangerous combination. After lengthy considerations, we decide to give it a go. We want to try the conditions out on the water to be able to make a better assessment. Maybe it looks better if we get past the next point? On the map it looks like there are several good landing places if we want to stop. Fredrik and I take the lead out to the surf at cape. We have paddled a few thousand miles together. Simon and Andreas have paddled only a few times before we came here.
It is possible to paddle but sways precariously. The waves are so big that we lose sight of the other canoe in the troughs. The farther from shore you paddle the more peaceful are the big waves. It feels safer closer to shore. This paddle session is a short one. When we see a beach that looks like a good landing place, we decide to stop. At least we have gotten away from the island and a bit further on the map. As we approach the beach, we realize how difficult it will be to get ashore with dry feet. Meter high waves wash into the shore. With some luck we manage to maneuver to surf the waves and turning broadside at the last moment. We throw ourselves out of the canoes and pull them up quickly. Whew!

We face two more storms on this trip. The main problem is the big waves that form. They can persist long after the wind has died down. Another problem is the sea breeze that can be very strong. When we get too much headwind is hardly worth while to paddle. We simply waste too much energy per mile. The solution is to paddle at night when the sea is calmer.

The third week, we have decided to cover more than 130 miles. This is because we want to have a margin for further storms. We now have less time for fishing. Although we fish less, all of us get fish every day. We encounter a phenomenon whereby large quantities of fish gather in schools at the surface. We encounter these schools away from the shore, for example, outside the river mouth, in a bay or in a straight. The schools always seems to be the size ordered. Fishes are usually 6-8 pounds or 8-10 pounds. The fish bite on any bait we present spoons, wobblers, jigs or spinners. The choice of bait depends more on what you yourself like, than what works. I myself like the heaviest Mörrum spinner which I think is easy to cast. However, it has a tendency to be “chewed” and crumpled after awhile. Even large jigs tear when the fish always bite. However, we do not consider this to be a major problem.
Even between the schools, we always fish. If we decide to eat fish for a meal someone simply goes down and “pick up” a fish from the lake. It seldom takes more than ten minutes. Lake trout is a great eating. It is deep red in the flesh and with a great taste. Although we eat it almost every day we are not bored. We can vary the cooking because we have brought with us several basic seasonings as capers, garlic, tomato paste, chili powder, curry, parmesan, pesto, coconut milk, etc.
We eat fish with spaghetti, cous-cous, rice or mashed potatoes. Good food is important for the comfort and well-being on long trips like this. For breakfast we eat flavored oatmeal that is just mixed with water. In North America, this can be found in regular supermarkets in a variety of flavors blueberry, peach, cinnamon and sugar, apple, etc. Overall, we were very happy with the food. We could eat us full every meal. Nevertheless, we all lost 15-20 pounds in weight. We bought food in a supermarket. Four men and four weeks, the total cost of Can $ 348 about 2,000 Swedish kronor. The few days we did not eat fish, were the days we managed to shoot some hares. Hares can be hunted all year around, provided you have purchased a small game license. The authorities strongly recommend that you bring you arm in order to protect yourself against bears. There are bear attacks recorded every year.

The staff at the camp had been worried about us. Especially considering the last day’s raging storm. They had already planned to start looking for us if we did not come back in time for the flight back to Winnipeg. We were told that others had tried similar trips on the lake all had given up and the radioed back asking to be picked up by a plane. Many of the guides were skeptical that we, as Europeans and not accustomed to the local conditions, could do it. We chose not to be bring satellite phone, radio or GPS equipment. This meant, of course, an increased risk. If you want navigate with just a map and compass, you have to be able to handle that the compass shows about 40 degrees wrong, because the magnetic north pole is near. The pilot who dropped us off 250 miles away at Richardson Island wanted half jokingly half seriously to take a photo of us “that would be worth the money if we did not come back.”
What we ourselves thought everyone misjudged was that experience from Swedish conditions makes you feel at home in the Canadian wilderness. We are all familiar with being out in the Swedish outdoor. Simon and Andreas grew up in Jämtland and have been out a lot in the Swedish mountains. That experience was enough to do this tour.
We noted the weight of all the fish we caught. As we summarized it turned out that we had caught almost 2 tons of fish.

PS.
To save some time, I google translated the text from the swedish original. It is far from perfect english but gives the text an exotic foreign touch. If it is hard to understand or if you have any questions I can be reached at josun07@googlemail.com.

Superior mirage 2

Superior mirage 2

Superior mirage 3

Superior mirage 3

Dinner. Fish w. Jamaican jerk and couscous

Dinner. Fish w. Jamaican jerk and couscous

Lake trout

Lake trout

Simon caught the first fish

Simon caught the first fish

Superior mirage 1

Superior mirage 1

Superior mirage 4

Superior mirage 4

IMGP0355
Near MacKenzie Island

Near MacKenzie Island

Deteriorating weatherSteep cliffs, cold and deep water523LaBinePoint
Mining history.

Mining history.
On May 16, 1930, Gilbert LaBine discovered a vein containing silver and pitchblende near this site. The discovery led to…..

After years of mining, the area has slightly elevated radiation levels.

Warning sign


<img src="https://paddlenorthwest.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/imgp0529.jpg?w=300" alt="Exploring the mining area.
As the area has been cleaned up, new prospecting has begun.width=”300″ height=”200″ class=”size-medium wp-image-122″ /> "
Exploring the mining area.
As the area has been cleaned up, new prospecting has begun.”
Road down to LaBine point

Road down to LaBine point

Sunset at Dease Arm

Sunset at Dease Arm

Délįne crowd enjoying a great day on the lake.

Délįne crowd enjoying a great day on the lake.

We met alot of people, once.

We met alot of people, once.

IMGP1004
Mc Tavish Arm

Mc Tavish Arm

Fred with Lake Trout

Fred with Lake Trout

Fred__IGP1257__IGP1276
Andreas fileting fish

Andreas fileting fish

__IGP1502__IGP1603__IGP1532Plummer's lodge img src=”https://paddlenorthwest.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/imgp0086.jpg?w=300&#8243; alt=”IMGP0086″ width=”300″ height=”200″ class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-52″ />IMGP0353

Stora björnsjön

Vi var fyra som åkte. Två av oss hade varit flera gånger i Northwest Territories, men aldrig till Stora björnsjön.

Vi hade drömt om Stora björnsjön i många år. Orörd natur, kristallklart vatten med mycket fisk, stor fisk. Sjön har ett antal spöfiskerekord. Flera ”Lake Trouts” eller Kanadarödingar på över trettio kilo har fångats.

Sjön som är världens nionde största ligger avsides vid polcirkeln i norra Kanada. Det finns inga vägar dit upp så man måste flyga. Antingen kan man chartra ett plan i exempelvis Yellowknife eller försöka hitta något reguljärt flyg.
Efter att ha undersökt och jämfört priser hade vi lyckats hitta en acceptabel lösning. Så billigt som möjligt var högsta prioritet. Två av deltagarna var studenter min bror Simon och hans barndomskompis Andreas. Vi hade fått kontakt med en fiskecamp vid norra delen av sjön. De kunde erbjuda restplatser på sina flyg upp till campen. Vi kunde dessutom få tillgång till campens bekvämligheter, hyra kanoter, få hjälp med transporten ut till startpunkten. Kort sagt de erbjöd sig lösa många av våra logistiska problem mot en kostnad på ca 18000 kronor. Priset inkluderade flyg ifrån staden Winnipeg i södra Kanada. Winnipeg kan lätt nås med reguljärflyg från Europa.
Vi räknade med att inte behöva köpa in någon speciell utrustning. Vi tänkte använda vad vi redan hade. Fiskeutrustning, tält, sovsäckar, kläder med mera som man kan använda i svenska förhållanden passar utmärkt även där. Som visas på bilderna så är det ingen exklusiv utrustning vi talar om. Andreas hade t.ex. med sig en Ambassadeur-rulle från sent 70-tal. Visst köpte vi lite extra fiskedrag i Winnipeg eftersom priserna var bra. Men maten var den största utgiftsposten.

Efter en dag i Winnipeg var det äntligen dags att flyga upp till fiskecampen. Tidigt på morgonen mötte vi andra förväntansfulla passagerarna ute på flygplatsen. Planet, en Boeing 727, skulle göra flera stopp på olika fiskecamper i Northwest Territories. Vår destination låg sist. Med stoppen skulle resan ta ca 6 timmar. Det var många amerikaner en del kanadensare. De åker upp och fiskar en vecka eller två. De fiskar nästan uteslutande från båt, guide ingår.
På campen serveras rejäl lagad mat. Login är små bekväma stugor med varierande antal bäddar för att passa olika sällskap. På kvällen öppnar baren vid den öppna brasan. Att åka hit upp och fiska en vecka är en verklig lyx. Tillvaron är tillrättalagd och chansen att fånga en drömfisk är god. Vi var emellertid ute efter en annan upplevelse.

Sjöflygplanet gör en snäv sväng och sjunker brant för att landa på vattnet. Landningsplatsen är en vik på sydöstra sidan av en stor ö, Richardsson Island. Ön är en av de få i området som har ett namn.

De är döpt efter Sir John Richardson som utforskade området på 1800-talet. Härifrån ska vi paddla ca 20 km, genom ett skärgårdsliknande område, till utloppet av Camsell River.

Dagen därpå når vi utmattade och med värk i musklerna utloppet efter en tung paddling i motvind. Jag tar en 4 kgs kanadaröding på första kastet. Vi får fisk på nästan varje kast. Vi får kanadaröding, gädda och harr. Ute i Stora björnsjön finns ingen gädda. Vattnet är för kallt för att gäddan ska trivas. Men här inne vid utloppet strömmar varmare vatten ut, från sjösystemen Hottah- och Faber Lake. Vi får ett antal harrar på ca 1 kg. De hugger till vår förvåning på stora skeddrag och Mörrumspinnare.

Hur förbereder man sig för att kunna paddla en hel dag? Ofta förekommer dessutom hårt väder vilket gör ansträngningen än större. Erfarenheterna från de tidigare gångerna vi har varit ute på liknande strapatser har visat att det inte går att klara av i närheten så mycket i början av turen som i slutet. Detta gäller oavsett hur mycket vi tränat innan. Just uthålligheten som gör att man kan paddla i tio till tolv timmar får man genom att just paddla riktigt länge under en längre tid. Vi har aldrig kunnat unna oss lyxen att förbereda oss genom ett träningsläger fyllt av paddling. Istället har vi inriktat oss på att vara i god allmän form både konditions- och styrkemässigt. Just styrketräning är att rekommendera för att slippa skador den första tiden. Speciellt styrka i armar, rygg och axlar är viktigt. Är man i god allmän form från början så kan man räkna med att kunna mångdubbla tiden man kan paddla per dag. Vi paddlade som mest ca. 6 mil på ett dygn. Det gjorde vi efter att ha varit ute två veckor på sjön.

Den 8:e Juli bryter vi lägret tidigt på morgonen på en ö utanför Richardson Island. Vädret är bra solsken, lätt vind och ca 15 grader varmt. Vädret är extra viktigt idag eftersom vi ska ut till Stora björnsjöns öppna vatten. Vi ska paddla norrut längs strandlinjen och kommer inte längre att vara skyddade av öarna i det skärgårdsliknande området innanför Richardson Island. Vi har blivit varnade för vindarna och de stora vågorna som kan blåsa upp. Vissa säger rent av att Stora björnsjön inte alls lämpar sig för kanotpaddling eftersom vädret kan vara så nyckfyllt. Det ligger en viss anspänning i luften då vi börjar paddlingen ut genom kanalen som guiderna på fiskecampen kallar ”Action Alley”.
Vi bestämmer oss för att ta en kort paus då vi börjar närmar oss mynningen av kanalen. Vi stiger iland på en öppen plats med bra uppsikt. Platsen visar sig snart bjuda på det bästa fiske någon av oss upplevt. Den steniga stranden stupar brant ner mot djupet. Där någonstans i djupet står mängder med fisk, stor fisk 5-8 kg. Fisken hugger hårt och bestämt på varje kast. Det här ett av de få tillfällen då vi alla fyra står och drillar fisk samtidigt. Då vi sammanfattar fångsten får vi den sammanlagda vikten till 90 kg. Andreas fick den största på 7,4 kg. Fullt acceptabelt för ca 20 minuters fiske.

Mynningen ut mot sjön inger respekt med sina branta vertikala klippor som inte ger någon möjlighet att stiga iland. Sjön är ändlös. Den ser ut som ett hav. I horisonten syns inget land bara dis. Vi möts av en kall bris som vittnar om att vattentemperaturen är betydligt lägre härute. Vattnet är mycket djupt.

Charlton bay 11:e Juli. Det är varmt på morgonen mer än 20 grader, vindstilla. Då vi paddlat ett tag börjar kalla dimslöjor svepa in från sjön. Det är en vacker syn och Fredrik passar på att ta en del bilder på fenomenet. Men dimman tilltar och efter tag har oroande låg sikt. Vi tar upp kompassen och håller oss nära strandkanten för att inte riskera att tappa sikte av land. Efter ytterligare en stunds paddling så börjar vinden tillta. Dimman löses upp och övergår i duggregn. Temperaturen har fallit dramatiskt den senaste timmen. Det börjar bli riktigt kallt. Eftersom det blivit nästan tid för en lunchpaus och vi vill sätta på oss regnkläder går vi iland på en ö. Vi ska få oss en lektion i Stora björnssjöns omtalade väderförhållanden. Regnet och vinden tilltar hela tiden. Temperaturen faller hela tiden. Det är nu bara några plusgrader. Vi har gått från högsommarväder till senhöst på bara några timmar. Vi drar upp kanoterna på land eftersom vågorna har blivit så stora att vi är rädda att de ska blåsa ut till sjöss. Vi lagar lunch och tar beslutet att avvakta i några timmar för att vädret ska lugna ner sig. Vi blir kvar på ön i två dygn.

Namnlös ö 13:e Juli. Vinden har nu lagt sig Men de stora dyningarna som blåst upp, långt ute på sjön, fortsätter att rulla in. Då de når stranden bryts de i vitt skum. Det ser egentligen inte så farligt ut om man nu väl lyckas komma ut från stranden. Men vi inser att komma in till land skulle kunna bli problematiskt. Vi börjar bli otåliga. Vi vill röra på oss. Komma vidare. Vi inser alla att det är en farlig kombination. Efter ett utdraget övervägande bestämmer vi oss för att prova. Prova på förhållandena ute på vattnet för att kunna göra en bättre bedömning. Kanske ser det bättre ut om vi kommer förbi nästa udde? På kartan ser det ut att finnas flera bra landstigningsplatser om vi vill avbryta. Jag och Fredrik tar täten ut mot bränningarna vid udden. Vi har paddlat ett par hundra mil tillsammans. Däremot har Simon och Andreas bara provat på att paddla några gånger innan vi åkte hit. Det går bra att paddla men gungar betänkligt. Vågorna är så pass stora att man förlorar sikten av den andra kanoten i vågdalarna. Ju längre från land man paddlar ju lugnare är de stora vågorna. Det känns tryggare närmare land. Det här paddelpasset blir inte långt. Då vi ser en sandstrand som ser ut som en bra landstigningsplats bestämmer vi oss för att avbryta. Vi har i alla fall kommit bort från ön och en bit framåt på kartan. Då vi närmar oss stranden inser vi hur svårt det kommer att bli att komma torrskodda i land. Meterhöga vågor sköljer in mot stranden. Med viss tur lyckas vi med manövern att surfa in på vågorna och vända bredsidan till i sista stund. Vi kastar oss ur kanoterna och drar snabbt upp dem. Puh!

Vi drabbas av ytterligare två stormar under tiden vi är ute. Problemet är främst de stora vågorna som bildas. De kan hålla i sig lång tid efter att vinden har lagt sig. Även om det inte stormar kan sjöbrisen bli så stark att den ställer till problem. Då vi får för mycket motvind är det knappt lönt att paddla. Vi gör helt enkelt av med för mycket energi per kilometer. Lösningen blir att paddla på nätterna då sjön är lugnare.

Den tredje veckan har vi bestämt oss för att avverka drygt tjugo mil. Detta för att vi ska ha en marginal på slutet om vi drabbas av ytterligare stormar. Vi får nu mindre tid för fiske. Även om vi fiskar mindre så får vi alla fisk varje dag. Vi stöter på ett fenomen som innebär att stora mängder fisk samlas i stim vid ytan. De här stimmen påträffar vi en bit ifrån land exempelvis utanför en åmynning, i en vik, i ett sund eller ovanför ett grund. Stimmen verkar alltid vara storlekssorterade. Fiskarna är vanligen 3-4 kg eller 4-5 kg. Fisken hugger på alla beten vi presenterar skeddrag, wobbler, jiggar eller spinnare. Valet av bete beror mer på vad man själv gillar än vad som fungerar. Själv gillar jag tyngsta Mörrumspinnaren som jag tycker är lättkastad. Den har emellertid en tendens att bli ”söndertuggad” och tillknycklad efter tag. Även stora jiggar slits hårt då fisken hela tiden hugger. Förstörda drag ser vi dock inte som ett stort problem.
Även mellan stimmen får vi hela tiden fisk. Bestämmer vi oss för att äta fisk till en måltid så går någon ner och ”hämtar upp” en fisk ur sjön. Det brukar sällan ta mer än tio minuter. Kanadarödingen är en fantastisk matfisk. Den är djupröd i köttet och med en fantastisk smak. Trots att vi äter den nästan varje dag ledsnar vi inte. Vi kan variera tillagningen genom att vi har tagit med oss flera olika baskryddningar som kapris, vitlök, tomatpasta, chilipulver, curry, parmesanost, pesto, kokosmjölk och några färdiga paneringar i olika smaker.
Vi äter fisken med spagetti, cous-cous, ris eller potatismos. Bra mat är viktigt för trivseln och välbefinnandet på så här långa turer. Till frukost äter vi smaksatt havregrynsgröt som bara blandas med vatten. I Nordamerika kan man i vanliga mataffärer köpa portionsförpackningar i en rad olika smaker blåbär, persika, kanel och socker, äpple etc. Överlag var vi mycket nöjda med maten. Vi kunde äta oss mätta varje måltid. Trots det gick vi alla ner 8-10 kg i vikt. Vi handlade mat i en vanlig mataffär. För fyra man och fyra veckor var den sammanlagda kostnaden 388 Can$ ca 2000 svenska kronor. De få dagarna vi inte äter fisk är då vi lyckats skjuta någon hare. Harar får man skjuta året runt förutsatt att man har köpt en småviltslicens. Myndigheterna rekommenderar starkt att man har med sig vapen så att man kan skydda sig mot björnar. Det sker björnattacker varje år.

Personalen på campen hade varit oroliga för oss. Speciellt med tanke på senaste dygnets rasande storm. De hade redan planerat att börja söka efter oss om vi inte kommit tillbaka innan flyget tillbaks till Winnipeg skulle avgå. Vi fick höra att andra som hade försökt sig på liknande turer ute på sjön alla hade gett upp och via radio begärt att bli hämtade med flyg. Att vi som européer som inte var vana vid förhållandena skulle klara det vi förutsatt oss var många av guiderna skeptiska till. Vi valde att inte ha med oss satellittelefon, radio eller gps-utrustning. Det innebar naturligtvis en ökad risk. Ska man navigera med bara karta och kompass så måste man kunna hantera att kompassen visar ca 40 grader fel, eftersom den magnetiska nordpolen ligger nära. Piloten som satte av oss fyrtio mil bort på Richardsson Island ville halvt på skämt halvt på allvar ta ett foto av oss ”som skulle vara värt pengar om vi inte kom tillbaka”.
Vad vi själva tyckte alla missbedömde var att vana från svenska förhållanden gör att man känner sig hemma i den kanadensiska vildmarken. Vi är alla vana från att vara ute i svensk skog och mark. Simon och Andreas är uppvuxna i Jämtland och har varit ute en hel del i svenska fjällen. De erfarenheterna har räckt för att genomföra här turen.
Vi noterade vikten på alla fiskar vi fångade. Då vi summerade visade det sig att vi tagit nästan 2 ton fisk.

josun07@googlemail.com